Saturday, 3 December 2016

Club Night - Ancients TtS! & SAGA

The Old Guard Wargames Group's latest meet was last night. A smaller turn out than previously, mainly due to work parties for Christmas etc, but we got in two games at our Scruton Village Hall venue.
6mm (Ancients) To the Strongest! - Athenian Greeks versus Persians
Players: Stuart (who's fig's and terrain we were using) and James (Mad Tin Hatter! blog) as the Greeks, against myself as the Persians. It turned out to be a very good game, with victory within the grasp of both sides.

The Persians initially attempting a redeployment strategy in the face of the enemy (thwarted by a pair of Aces! - meaning the turn was over for me), with demonstrations on both wings and a refused flank. The Persians playing the long game, allowing the Greeks to commit themselves across the battlefield - which they did by moving forward across their whole front, "Attack being the best form of Defence" I was told, and moving to restrict the Persian's redeployment options.

The game focused mainly on the centre and the Persian's (attempted, but failed, refused flank). James' Hoplites in the centre, whom suffered from Persian cavalry charges, and Stuart's flank command seizing command of an entire wing of the battlefield and pinning my Left Command into its deployment area.

The game finished with the Greek's only left with x1 Victory Medal (meaning if they lost that medal they'd have lost the game) and the Persian's last x3 Victory Medals being taken by James' Hoplite charge into the Persian camp. Heck of a good game.

The Persian (that being me) Grand Plan:
Initial deployment saw the Persian army spread out to meet the Greek's whole front.
 Phase One: The Light Cavalry on both wings would move forward, in demonstration, while the Medium and Guard Cavalry would move obliquely in front of the right-flank units. The infantry on the left-flank occupying the ground just vacated by the central cavalry units - so, effectively, operating a refused flank strategy on the Persian left.
Phase Two: The left-hand Light Cavalry would retire, while the right-hand Light cavalry would move forward and continue to harass the Greek wing with missile fire. The scythed chariot, now being free to charge forward, the Medium and Guard Cavalry all charging into the Greek central units. 

What actually happened: Well, the Persian plan pretty much worked, and the units moved as planned. The Chariots were charged before they themselves were able to attack, however, and were lost. The redeploying infantry on the Persian left were thwarted by failed command tests and never managed to form a defensive line on the Camp. The Light Cavalry retiring in the face of the enemy; one was wiped out due to skirmish missile fire, and the other voluntarily left the field, and never managed to return. The Medium and Guard Cavalry units worked a treat and really gave it all they had against the Greek Hoplite units, destroying Greek units or severely disrupting them and causing the Greek command to have to divert Hoplites from their flank to strengthen their centre. The Persian refused left-flank was pinned back by the Greeks, though still in a strong condition, and the game was taken by a unit of Greek Hoplites charging into the undefended Persian Camp. 

A very good game!

Image courtesy of The Mad Tin Hatter
Image courtesy of The Mad Tin Hatter
Image courtesy of The Mad Tin Hatter
Image courtesy of The Mad Tin Hatter


The above image shows off 'The Plan' in action:-
Both Light Cavalry on the wings have moved forward. 
The central Guard & Medium Cavalry has moved obliquely to their right. (the Chariots are destroyed)
The Infantry on the left wing has turned facing and is about to march towards their camp... 
...Well, that was what was meant to happen!
The other game on the night saw John (Normans) playing against Pete (Anglo-Danish) in a game of SAGA. Which I'm afraid I didn't really get chance to see much of, nor take many photo's of. 
Another cracking good games night, all helping to motivate me to paint up my 28mm Ancient Germans and to dig out my own SAGA bits and bobs. 

Cheers for looking.
Roy

18 comments:

  1. What a nice report...with wonderful buildings!

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    1. @Phil: Thank you. Yes, both the 6mm buildings and the 28mm buildings are really nice. I really like how Pete has finished the roofs on those 28mm houses.

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  2. Great stuff Roy. Love the look of the Saga game!

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    1. @Rodger: Thanks. Yes, It did look good. I'm hoping to have a learning game of SAGA at some point, so will hopefully get the chance to view Pete's terrain in better detail.

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  3. Thanks for the game Roy, was a close one and could have gone either way but for some other turns of the cards!

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    1. @James MacCraggs: You're welcome James.

      Yes, I was fortunate with most of my command activation draws, and so you might have pressurised my right flank if it hadn't have been for those four Aces you pulled - That would have seen a totally different game, though I might have got better use out of my mainly bow-armed right-hand command. As the Persian cavalry was blocking LOS for most of the game, so they really did bugger all.

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  4. "I love it when a plan comes together", springs to mind. Your Persians did good and the game looks like it was a lot of fun too.
    I like the look and idea of SAGA games (and have played one too!0 bu I'm undecdied about the whole experience.

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    1. @Zabadak: Yes, it was a good game, and even though I did lose I don't actually feel like I did as it was so close and my plan was 75% successful.

      I think the club I'm with is pretty much undecided with SAGA. One chap loves them, a couple of others think they're all right, and one doesn't particularly like them at all - He prefers Lion Rampant.

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    2. Saga for me was a good idea BUT it all went wrong when a club member played competitively in tournaments. he is a nice guy but always has to win! Always take the most competitive army and not only knows all the rules inside out, but takes great delight in beating new players. Needless to say that attitude does little to encourage them.

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    3. @Clint: We had players like that at one of the old GW clubs I was a member of. They totally suck out the enjoyment from a game and are a pain to play against. Thankfully I haven't met any gamer like that since I stopped attending GW clubs. I don't mind a competitive game, but when it becomes the be all and end all its taking it too far.

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  5. I am a big fan of 6mm figures, easy to store easy to transport and just as good as 15mm figs.

    I am also a big fan of to the Strongest, so from my point of view what a brilliant post.

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    1. @Clint: Thanks Clint. Got to admit that playing TtS! with those 6mm was easier than with a whole table of 28mm units. It allowed me to see the tactical situation far easier and plan out what needed to be done to meet the enemy's moves than when I've played on a 8' table using 28mm unit - They just became one large horde and I couldn't stand back or look down to get a grasp on the situation.

      Just got hold of a copy of Basic Impetus Vol. 2, and am planning on collecting a 6mm 'Minor Greek City State' army next year at some point. I like the look of the Scythian army too, so they might get a look in as well. I'll probably collect enough to use for TtS!, and at the moment am looking at what is available in 6mm. The figures shown in this blog post are Rapier Miniatures, which are nice, but I'm also liking the Baccus6mm stuff.

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