Friday, 7 October 2016

Clint's Blog Game - My Little Imagi-Nation!

Clint, over at Anything But A One! blog [LINK], is running another Play By Blog game and I've been lucky enough to land a starting slot.

Basically, myself and the other starting players are in charge of a small, fledgling nation, that has emerged from the breaking up of the much-larger country of Klintanistan.

Set in the Inter-War years of the early C20th, Klintanistan is a completely fictitious location that Clint (the Games Master) has cleverly left none-specific in detail, so as to allow it to be anything to all players and readers alike. In fact, one of the clever design features of Clint's game is the lack of detailed specifics, and lack of maps, which allows freedom of imagination for all involved and a real ability for the game play to be only restricted by the player's imaginations.

But enough with all that, let us get down to business.

I am in control of my own little nation. I've even given it a name! Centralandesh. Chosen a couple of features that should populate it's bite-sized map, and given them all names - Though if my country becomes invaded, or I'm ejected from office, there's nothing stopping other player's altering these names once they're in charge.
Edit: the railroad is just a terrain feature - it has been abandoned and the tracks mostly stripped for scrap or firewood.
The Klintanistan Railroad Company fleeing at the time of the fall of Klintanistan.
At the start of the game it doesn't actually work - as there are no engines, rolling stock, nor is there a functioning railway system.

So, I've a country to rule. I've decided I'm the President. Supposedly I'm a Socialist, but this being the mad-cap time frame of the Inter-War years that doesn't count for much. 

The largest settlement is called Comchar, and it is situated on the banks of the Cama River. It once was connected to a rail network of a single track, but now Klintanistan is no more, the Railway Company has fled and the track has been vandalised and the parts taken for firewood and scrap. The only way people are able to get from Comchar to the nation's other large settlement, Khulpur Junction, is either by horse and cart or to walk there!

In the game each player's playing nations begins with Five Regions (we all know what each of us have). 

Centralandesh has these Five Regions:
Grain
Grain
Livestock
Livestock
Game Hunting

Meaning the economy of Centralandesh is dependant upon farming, and the wealth of the citizens unequally distributed (land owners being wealthy, and land workers being poor). 

Other than all of that, my game position is free of specific details. I could go further, but at the moment I'm keeping it simple. 

All that is left to do now is see how I, and everyone else, goes onward in-game.

Wish us all luck! 

9 comments:

  1. excellent, I shall look forward to stealing your sheep

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    1. @Martin Cooke: Our Shepherdesses are all Government trained seductresses, intent on capturing the hearts of brigands and forcing them into marriage, where they'll be absorbed into our population! :)

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  2. I may be able to feed your sheep 😀

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    1. @Matt Crump: Hmm, yes the Trade Ministry of the Government of Centalandesh was most perturbed when they saw your abundance of grain resources. Not that we were considering a Price Trade War, you understand!

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  3. Nice one.

    Yep pure imagination set in the 1930's. I hope you have fun and the map is ace.

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    1. Thanks Clint.

      The map is a collection of borrowed elements from other wargame campaign maps, or PBM maps, I've seen in the past. If nothing else, my map will allow me to roleplay a narrative.

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  4. I've always thought a campaign (no mater the type) is never truly a campaign without a map to ponder. I like your nice, simple and very effective approach.

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    1. @Zabadak: Thank you

      I wouldn't like to guess how many maps I've (computer, plus pen and paper) drawn over the last few years. I blame Henry Hyde and his Battlegames Magazine, when he first wrote about his Wars of the Faltonian Succession campaigns I got a little too carried away with map drawing for imagi-nations.

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    2. I know only too well the feeling. I have maps I used way back to the 1970s as I really haven't the heart to thrwo them, they bring back many fond memories!

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